We’re all in this together

So I was planning to write a post on this outfit here, all about this trench coat that I picked up recently. And as lovely as it is (and its definitely giving me those holly go-lightly vibes), I felt that I wanted to use this space to write about something with a little more substance. In my last post I wrote about some of the best tips and tricks I learnt while studying at University; it was less of a serious list and more poking fun at my experience, so if you haven’t read it be sure to check it out. But writing that also got my thinking about what it’s like for us young folk these days, who are recently out of education and doing our best to navigate through this thing called adulthood. Not going to lie, it’s a strange time isn’t it?

From a young age, a huge amount of pressure is placed on students to choose the ‘right’ subjects for their GCSEs options and A levels and it can feel that once those subjects are chosen you are committing yourself to a certain career path for the rest of your education. Slightly daunting decision for a 14 year old to make innit? Hopefully the picture is different for teenagers at school today, but it’s definitely something I experienced and have talked about a lot with friends and tutors through my time at University. What I find interesting though is that while there is this huge expectation on students to know what they want to be, the lack of practical advice given to students on how to actually ‘adult’ is worrying.

It’s great if you’ve got parents who can help fill in the gaps, to tell you what a P46 is and how to fill one out, and explain to you the difference between fabric softener and detergent (seriously some of us are not naturally blessed with this knowledge, and that’s okay). Supportive friends and family are great too, and I’m thankful that in times of panic I’ve had people at the end of the phone who have been patient and kind enough to help me through a daunting situation. But I’m aware that’s not the case for some, and as lovely as my support-network are, I can’t help feeling that there needs to be more available to students and graduates to guide them through this awkward transition.

But I think the most important thing people need to hear is that it’s okay to not have a set plan on what you’re doing- neigh, it’s actually normal! If you have a clear idea of the exact job you want, where you want to live when you settle down, and what colour your dream car will be that’s great. (Mine is charcoal grey FYI). But I feel the majority of us don’t know all these things, and although we might have ideas, if we were asked where we’ll be in 10 years time, we might not have an answer.

This uncertainty can be seen as a negative thing, as if it’s bad if you don’t know what you want when you’re looking at GCSEs, A Levels, Universities or jobs. But I think it’s something that should be celebrated in each other, because it shows that you don’t want to settle doing something you’re not passionate about, and don’t want to just follow the crowd. By recognising that you don’t know what you want to do can give you an open mind, consider different opportunities and be open to what life throws at you.

Which is pretty exciting really!

It can also feel isolating when you’re not sure what you want to do, and it seems as if everyone around you has a 5 year plan and a detailed flow chart on exactly how they’re going to achieve their goals. But do not fear, because you are actually not in the minority. Of course at school and university there were the ones who appeared to have it totally together and knew exactly what they were going to be. But after speaking to them I realised a lot of us were in the same boat, totally unsure of these things and lots of us feeling a bit frazzled at trying to work it out alone. And come to think about it, every person I’ve spoken to about this- friends, family, colleagues- all seemto be facing some level of uncertainty in where they’re going. It’s so reassuring to know you’re not alone, and is a really good reminder while some people seem to have everything perfectly together, the chances are they figuring it out just like you.

I feel like the last couple of years have been a massive learning curve for me, as leaving school and becoming the independent lady that I am (lol) has made me realise that many things in life can’t be predicted or planned. While it’s great to think ahead and make plans, it’s equally important to have an open mind and follow your interests and skills as you grow as a person. And although it can be frustrating at times not knowing exactly where you’re going and what’ll be doing in 10 years time, in the wise words of Ronan Keeting, ‘life is a rollercoaster, you just got to ride it’

xoxo

  • Trench Coat- Topshop
  • Top- Asos
  • Sandals- Newlook
  • Photography- Olivia Foley 

   

  

  • Trench Coat- Topshop
  • Top- Asos
  • Sandals- Newlook
  • Photography- Olivia Foley 

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